Nurse’s Knowledge Aspects of Enhancing Haemoglobin Level and Safety through Delayed Cord Clamping Time in a Semi-urban Hospital in South Rift Region, Kenya

  • Wesley Kipkorir Bor Kabarak University, Kenya
  • Dorcus K Mbithe Kenyatta University Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Irine Ogada St. Francis Xavier University, Canada
  • Wesley K Too Kabarak University, Kenya

Abstract

Nurse’s Knowledge Aspects of Enhancing Haemoglobin Level and Safety through Delayed Cord Clamping Time in a Semi-urban Hospital in South Rift Region, Kenya

Author (s): Wesley Bor1,3, Dorcus Mbithe1, Irene Ogada2 and Wesley Too3

 

Affiliations: 1 Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics, Kenyatta University 2. Department of Human Nutrition, St. Francis Xavier University, Canada. 3. School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Kabarak University

 

Correspondence: Wesley Bor: Email: wbor84@gmail.com or wbor@kabarak.ac.ke

 

Background: The clamping of the umbilical cord can be done at different times after delivery, although delaying the clamping of the cord for ≥ 1 minute after birth improves the haemoglobin levels for newborn and variation may lead to safety issues and influence of the haemoglobin status of the infants. There is limited literature on the knowledge of health care providers on the optimal time to clamp the umblical cord after delivery.

 

Objective: To assess the nurse’s knowledge aspect on enhancing haemoglobin levels through delayed cord clamping in a semi urban Hospital in South Rift Region, Kenya

 

Methods: The Participants nurses in the study were enrolled through simple random sampling in maternity and delivery rooms and the aspect of knowledge was assessed using Pre-test questionnaire.

 

Results: Half of the nurses (50%) had knowledge that delayed clamping is recommended. However, 69% had knowledge that delayed cord clamping should be performed for those infants requiring essential care under maximum safety conditions while 94% reported that delayed cord clamping is beneficial to the infant and does not interfere assessment of the baby and administration of uterotonic drugs. A bout 31% had incorrect knowledge that delayed umblical cord clamping increases the infant’s risk of acquiring HIV. Half of the nurses (50%) of nurses had knowledge that the World Health Organization (WHO) 2014 guidelines recommended delayed cord clamping for all infants without medical complications including infants of women who are HIV positive.

 

Conclusion: The nurse’s knowledge on the optimal time to clamp the umblical cord after delivery was not uniform. Majority of the nurses had knowledge that delayed cord clamping increases the risk of mother to child HIV transmission and aspect of knowledge affected the safety level of infant haemoglobin levels.

 

Recommendation: Relevant stakeholders should consider developing national guideline and standard operational procedures on Umblical Cord Clamping after delivery.

 

 

Key Words: Nurses, Knowledge, Safety, Haemoglobin, Cord Clamping and Time 

 

Author Biographies

Wesley Kipkorir Bor, Kabarak University, Kenya

 

Kabarak University , School of Medicine and Health Science, Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

Dorcus K Mbithe, Kenyatta University Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics

Chair Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics

Kenyatta University, Kenya

Irine Ogada, St. Francis Xavier University, Canada

Assistant Professor

Department of Human Nutrition, St. Francis Xavier University, Canada

Wesley K Too, Kabarak University, Kenya

Dean

School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Kabarak University Kenya

References

Care, E. N., Factors, A., Working, M., Centers, H., & Zone, J. (2018). Knowledge and Practice of Essential Newborn Care and Associated Factors among Nurses and Midwives Working at Health Centers in Jimma, 7(1), 1–10. http://doi.org/10.4172/2167-1168.1000446

Downey, C., & Bewley, S. (2012). Historical perspectives on umbilical cord clamping and neonatal transition. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 105(8), 325–9. http://doi.org/10.1258/jrsm.2012.110316

Fadare, J. O., Enwere, O. O., Afolabi, A., Chedi, B., & Musa, A. (2011). Knowledge, attitude and practice of adverse drug reaction reporting among healthcare workers in a tertiary centre in Northern Nigeria. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, 10(3), 235–242. http://doi.org/10.4314/tjpr.v10i3.4

Godlee, F., Pakenham-walsh, N., Ncayiyana, D., Cohen, B., & Packer, A. (2015). Can we achieve health information for all by 2015 ?, 1–6.

Hattie, J. A. T., & Donoghue, G. M. (2018). A model of learning. Contemporary Theories of Learning, 97–113. http://doi.org/10.4324/9781315147277-7

Madhavanprabhakaran, G. K., Wittmann, A. L., Aldughaishi, T., & Thomas, D. S. (2017). Knowledge and Practice of Umbilical Cord Clamping among Maternity Care Providers, (Md). http://doi.org/10.22038/JMRH.2018.23553.1252

Obimbo, E., Musoke, R., & Were, F. (1999). Knowledge, attitudes and practices of mothers and knowledge of health workers regarding care of the newborn umbilical cord. East African Medical Journal, 76(8), 425–429.

Pakenham-Walsh, N., & Bukachi, F. (2009). Information needs of health care workers in developing countries: a literature review with a focus on Africa. Human Resources for Health, 7, 30. http://doi.org/10.1186/1478-4491-7-30

Taha, Fa. A. N. (2011). Assessment of knowledge of nurse midwves toward immediate of the newborn, 9(9).

WHO. (2014). Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping. World Health Organization.

Care, E. N., Factors, A., Working, M., Centers, H., & Zone, J. (2018). Knowledge and Practice of Essential Newborn Care and Associated Factors among Nurses and Midwives Working at Health Centers in Jimma, 7(1), 1–10. http://doi.org/10.4172/2167-1168.1000446

Downey, C., & Bewley, S. (2012). Historical perspectives on umbilical cord clamping and neonatal transition. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 105(8), 325–9. http://doi.org/10.1258/jrsm.2012.110316

Fadare, J. O., Enwere, O. O., Afolabi, A., Chedi, B., & Musa, A. (2011). Knowledge, attitude and practice of adverse drug reaction reporting among healthcare workers in a tertiary centre in Northern Nigeria. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, 10(3), 235–242. http://doi.org/10.4314/tjpr.v10i3.4

Godlee, F., Pakenham-walsh, N., Ncayiyana, D., Cohen, B., & Packer, A. (2015). Can we achieve health information for all by 2015 ?, 1–6.

Hattie, J. A. T., & Donoghue, G. M. (2018). A model of learning. Contemporary Theories of Learning, 97–113. http://doi.org/10.4324/9781315147277-7

Madhavanprabhakaran, G. K., Wittmann, A. L., Aldughaishi, T., & Thomas, D. S. (2017). Knowledge and Practice of Umbilical Cord Clamping among Maternity Care Providers, (Md). http://doi.org/10.22038/JMRH.2018.23553.1252

Obimbo, E., Musoke, R., & Were, F. (1999). Knowledge, attitudes and practices of mothers and knowledge of health workers regarding care of the newborn umbilical cord. East African Medical Journal, 76(8), 425–429.

Pakenham-Walsh, N., & Bukachi, F. (2009). Information needs of health care workers in developing countries: a literature review with a focus on Africa. Human Resources for Health, 7, 30. http://doi.org/10.1186/1478-4491-7-30

Taha, Fa. A. N. (2011). Assessment of knowledge of nurse midwves toward immediate of the newborn, 9(9).

WHO. (2014). Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping. World Health Organization.

Published
2020-04-23
How to Cite
Bor, W. K., Mbithe, D. K., Ogada, I., & Too, W. K. (2020). Nurse’s Knowledge Aspects of Enhancing Haemoglobin Level and Safety through Delayed Cord Clamping Time in a Semi-urban Hospital in South Rift Region, Kenya. Kabarak Journal of Research & Innovation, 9(1), 17-21. Retrieved from http://ojs.kabarak.ac.ke/index.php/journal1/article/view/294